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Simple is Best! Soft and Creamy Deep-Fried Taro Roots in Sauce (Agedashi)

Simple is Best! Soft and Creamy Deep-Fried Taro Roots in Sauce (Agedashi)

Crispy on the outside, and soft and creamy on the inside. Deep fry until crispy, and toss into a sweet-savory sauce. It's so simple, but I think this is the best way to enjoy satoimo (taro root).

Ingredients: 2-3 servings

Taro root, small
15-20
Flour + katakuriko
1 tablespoon each
☆Mentsuyu
1/4 cup (50 ml)
☆Mirin
1/4 cup (50 ml)
☆Dashi stock (or 1/4 cup water + 2 tablespoons sake)
1/4 cup (50 ml) or more to taste
Shiso leaves, green onion, ginger, grated daikon radish, or other condiments of your choice.
to taste
Sauce recipe without mentsuyu:
★Soy sauce
3 tablespoons
★Mirin
3 tablespoons
★Sugar
2 tablespoons
★Dashi stock (or 1/4 cup water + 2 tablespoons sake)
1/4 cup (50 ml) or more to taste

Steps

1. Boil the taro roots without removing the skin (until a bamboo skewer goes through easily). Alternatively, wrap in plastic and microwave for 4-5 minutes until tender.
2. Put the cooked taro roots in water while they are still hot, and slip off the skin. (The skin comes off very easily, so you could get your kids to help out here and have fun.)
3. While the taro roots are still warm, add 2 teaspoon of mentsuyu (not listed) to flavor. Put the taro roots in a plastic bag with the flour and katakuriko.
4. Holding the bag closed with your hands, shake the bag to coat the taro roots in the flour. Put the ☆ or ★ sauce ingredients in a heatproof container, and heat in the microwave just before it comes to a boil.
5. Deep fry the taro roots in 180 °C oil until crispy on the outside. Before you remove them, reduce the temperature of the oil to cook the surface to a crispy golden finish.
6. Drain the oil. Put the hot taro roots in the Step 5 sauce. Serve with shiso leaves or grated ginger ♪ Chopped green onions and grated daikon radish go well with them, too!
7. Taro roots strengthen the mucous membranes in your stomach, and are rich in mucin, which is good for your immune system. It's also rich in protein. Taro roots were a valuable source of protein in the days before meat was eaten in Japan.

Story Behind this Recipe

I make this whenever taro root are in season. The rich sauce really whets your appetite ♪