Panzerotti with Semolina Powder

Panzerotti with Semolina Powder

I made panzerotti dumplings that look exactly like the ones sold in a shop in Luini in Milan! They look sweet, but they're actually Italian-style gyoza dumplings.

Ingredients: 2 servings [10 dumplings]

For the dough:
Semolina powder or bread flour
100 g
Cake flour
70 g
Dry yeast
1/2 teaspoon
Lukewarm water
1/2 cup
Sugar and salt
a pinch each
Olive oil
1 teaspoon
Standard filling:
1 large
Olive oil
7 ml
Mozzarella cheese
100 g
Minced olives (optional)
5 olives' worth
Filling 1--Simple:
Cinnamon powder
a small amount
Filling 2--Fish flavored:
Canned sardines (roughly chopped)
2 sardines
Filling 3--Meat flavored:
Ham (roughly chopped)
50 g


1. Dissolve the dry yeast in 1 tablespoon lukewarm water. Add all the ingredients for the dough little by little and knead. Form the dough to the consistency of a baby's cheek.
2. Cover it with plastic wrap, and let it sit for 1 hour in a sunny place until it expands. Knead the dough and then cover it again, making it airtight and set it in the fridge to rise a second time.
3. Finely chop the tomato, and then cook it with olive oil over low-medium heat. Simmer it until it cooks down to about half into a purée.
4. The important point is not to overpower the flavor of the fillings, and not to use strong tasting cheese; therefore there's no need to add basil or garlic to the tomato.
5. Dice the mozzarella cheese into 1 cm cubes and finely mince the olives.
6. Take the dough out and roll it into a 3 cm diameter log, and divide it into 2 cm pieces. Place the cut side on a plastic cutting board, then flatten them into a circle to make the dough for the dumplings.
7. Leave the center slightly thicker than the edges to prevent them from breaking. I rolled them out to approximately 8 cm diameter. A small wooden rolling pin would be handy here.
8. All that's left is for you is to fold them up. Place the tomato purée and the cheese on top. Wrap the three types of fillings.
9. When wrapping, press out any air pockets inside. Wet the edges with water, then seal them tightly.
10. Fry them in oil over medium heat until golden brown. They are best enjoyed piping hot! It'll make you feel like you just took a trip to Milan. The cheese and tomato purée should burst from then center when you cut into it.
11. The authentic version doesn't use any semolina powder--only bread flour. The only fillings available are ham, tomatoes, and mozzarella cheese.
12. This recipe has been handed down for three generations in Luini, which is in the tip of the boot shape of Italy. They aren't traditionally eaten in Southern Italy, so it was introduced by immigrants.
13. It seems like a lot of famous architects, designers, and politicians are from the south of Italy, and are known for being aggressive.
14. This is a different version of these dumplings that uses mashed potatoes as the main ingredient. You can make them as you like, or as they do in Luini.
15. At first, it was just people in southern Italy who ate this, but now, even foreign tourists line up to buy them. One costs about 250 yen.

Story Behind this Recipe

I have never had Panzerotti from Luini. I tried making them with various ingredients. Today Chi-san passed away, so I wanted to post something in commemoration.