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Taro Manju with Sticky Sauce

Taro Manju with Sticky Sauce

These are shumai-like dumplings with a minced pork filling and Japanese-style ankake sauce.
They were even more popular with my family than taro croquettes.

Ingredients: Makes six 7cm-wide manju

☆Taro roots (parboiled, then peeled)
300g
☆Katakuriko
3 tablespoons
☆Salt, coarsely ground pepper
to taste
●Ground pork
100g
●Carrot (finely chopped)
1/8 (about 25g)
●Onion (finely chopped)
1/4 (about 40g)
●Weipa or salt
1/4 teaspoon
●Soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon
●Sugar
1/2 teaspoon
●Sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon
●Katakuriko
1/2 teaspoon
●Oyster sauce
1 teaspoon
●Sake
1 teaspoon
●Pepper
a small amount
Katakuriko
as needed
△Mentsuyu (3x concentrate)
25ml
△Water
75ml
△Dashi stock granules
1/4 teaspoon
△Mirin
1/2 tablespoon
△Katakuriko
1 teaspoon

Steps

1. Soften the taro roots by either boiling or steaming, then mash them while still hot and mix in the ☆ ingredients. Divide into 6 portions.
2. For rolling the balls in Step 4, wet your hands so the dough doesn't stick.
3. Combine the ● ingredients in a bowl and mix until sticky. Divide into 6 portions and roll into balls.
4. Roll out the dough from Step 1 with the center thicker than the periphery (as when making gyoza skins). Wrap the mixture from Step 3.
5. Form the manju into 2-3cm thick balls and lightly sprinkle with katakuriko. Heat a fair amount of oil in a pan over medium-low heat, then arrange the manju in the pan.
6. Once the manju are lightly browned on one side, flip and cover the pot and steam until fully cooked, about 5-7 minutes.
7. Remove the lid, increase the heat and fry until both sides are browned and crisp. Remove excess oil and plate.
8. For the ankake sauce, heat the △ ingredients in a small pot over medium heat, stirring frequently. Once it begins to bubble, remove from heat and pour over Step 7.
9. I recommend making your own ankake sauce, but you can also try them with your favorite store-bought sauce, such as okonomiyaki sauce, ketchup, or ponzu sauce.
10. My son loves them with ketchup and mayo.
11. Here's a shot of the filling.

Story Behind this Recipe

I usually make croquettes with leftover taro, but since breadcrumbs are tricky to use and I'm watching my calories, I took a hint from my favorite taro mochi, and tried this recipe. It turned out great!